Information to those who would remove

Those, who desire to understand the State of Government in America, would do well to read the Constitutions of the several States, and the Articles of Confederation that bind the whole together for general Purposes, under the Direction of one Assembly, called the Congress.

He, de hog, no workee; he eat, he drink, he walk about, he go to sleep Information to those who would remove he please, he libb like a gentleman. In Europe it has indeed its value; but it is a commodity that cannot be carried to a worse market than that of America, where people do not inquire concerning a stranger, What is he?

The almost general Mediocrity of Fortune that prevails in America, obliging its People to follow some Business for Subsistance, those Vices that arise usually from Idleness are in a great Measure prevented.

In short, America is the Land of Labour, and by no means what the English call Lubberland, and the French Pays de Cocagne, where the streets are said to be pav'd with half-peck Loaves, the Houses til'd with Pancakes, and where the Fowls fly about ready roasted, crying, Come eat me!

Of civil Offices, or Employments, there are few; no superfluous Ones, as in Europe; and it is a Rule establish'd in some of the States, that no Office should be so profitable as to make it desirable. The Writer of this has known several Instances of large Tracts of Land, bought, on what was then the Frontier of Pensilvania, for ten Pounds per hundred Acres, which, after twenty Years, when the Settlements had been extended far beyond them, sold readily, without any Improvement made upon them, for three Pounds per Acre.

With regard to Encouragements for Strangers from Government, they are really only what are derived from good Laws and Liberty. These Contracts for Apprentices are made before a Magistrate, who regulates the Agreement according to Reason and Justice, and, having in view the Formation of a future useful Citizen, obliges the Master to engage by a written Indenture, not only that, during the time of Service stipulated, the Apprentice shall be duly provided with Meat, Drink, Apparel, washing, and Lodging, and, at its Expiration, with a compleat new Suit of Cloaths, but also that he shall be taught to read, write, and cast Accompts; and that he shall be well instructed in the Art or Profession of his Master, or some other, by which he may afterwards gain a Livelihood, and be able in his turn to raise a Family.

BF took the opportunity to set title pages for both French imprints. Such may therefore remove with Advantage to America. What explains the undercurrent tone of "Whew! Multitudes of poor People from England, Ireland, Scotland, and Germany, have by this means in a few years become wealthy Farmers, who, in their own Countries, where all the Lands are fully occupied, and the Wages of Labour low, could never have emerged from the poor Condition wherein they were born.

But if England will have a Manufacture of Silk as well as that of Cloth, and France one of Cloth as well as that of Silk, these unnatural Operations must be supported by mutual Prohibitions or high Duties on the Importation of each others Goods, by which means the Workmen are enabled to tax the home-Consumer by greater Prices, while the higher Wages they receive makes them neither happier nor richer, since they only drink more and work less.

The almost general Mediocrity of Fortune that prevails in America, obliging its People to follow some Business for Subsistance, those Vices that arise usually from Idleness are in a great Measure prevented.

Much less is it advisable for a person to go thither, who has no other quality to recommend him but his birth.

Information to Those Who Would Remove to America, [before March 1784]

Multitudes of poor people from England, Ireland, Scotland, and Germany, have by this means in a few years become wealthy farmers, who, in their own countries, where all the lands are fully occupied, and the wages of labor low, could never have emerged from the poor condition wherein they were born.

He finds it is imagined by numbers, that the inhabitants of North America are rich, capable of rewarding, and disposed to reward, all sorts of ingenuity; that they are at the same time ignorant of all the sciences, and, consequently, that strangers, possessing talents in the belles-lettres, fine Arts, etc.

Franklin goes on to say that there is no point in leaving Europe if you think that your birth matters. Hence it is easy for poor Families to get their Children instructed; for the Artisans are so desirous of Apprentices, that many of them will even give Money to the Parents, to have Boys from Ten to Fifteen Years of Age bound Apprentices to them till the Age of Twenty-one; and many poor Parents have, by that means, on their Arrival in the Country, raised Money enough to buy Land sufficient to establish themselves, and to subsist the rest of their Family by Agriculture.

There small Capitals laid out in Lands, which daily become more valuable by the Increase of People, afford a solid Prospect of ample Fortunes thereafter for those Children.

Information to Those Who Would Remove to America

His vision of the United States, then, is that it is a country where everyone is equal to one another. These Constitutions have been printed by order of Congress in America; two Editions of them have also been printed in London; and a good Translation of them into French has lately been published at Paris.

What do the metaphors suggest about Americans' hopes and fears after the war? They are pleased with the observation of a Negro, and frequently mention it, that Boccarorra meaning the white men make de black man workee, make de horse workee, make de ox workee, make ebery ting workee; only de hog.

He says that people from Europe think that they could How did Rush explain the evolving "American character" to his European readers?Information to Those Who Would Remove to America (On the Virtue of Industriousness), Many persons in Europe, having directly or by letters, expressed to the writer of this, who is well acquainted with North America, their desire of transporting and establishing themselves in that country; but who appear to have formed, through ignorance, mistaken ideas and expectations of what is to be.

“Information to Those Who Would Remove to America” was one of two essays printed at Passy around early March, The other was “Remarks concerning the Savages of North America,” published above under the date [before January 7].

INDEPENDENCE: 1783-1791

Neither essay can be dated precisely. Those who desire to understand the State of Government in America, would do well to read the Constitutions of the several States, and the Articles of Confederation that bind the whole together for general Purposes under the Direction of one Assembly called the Congress.

In the late ’s, preciselyBenjamin Franklin wrote an informative essay titled, Information to Those Who Would Remove to America.

Information To Those Who Would Remove To America Summary

It was printed out as a pamphlet for people in Europe to clarify the endless rumors about America being the land of dreams and fantasy. The major point that Franklin is trying to make in this piece is that the United States is a country in which people are all fairly equal.

Information to Those Who Would Remove to America, [before March 1784]

It is an egalitarian country both in attitudes and in. Essay Information to Those Who Would Remove to America Information to those who would remove to America By: Benjamin Franklin At a time of hardship and human progression in North America especially in the ’s one name specifically shines out amongst all others.

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Information to those who would remove
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